Piaggio Gull

The Project:

This aircraft had outdated flight instruments, many of which were original. The goal of the project was to integrate modern avionics into this unique and historic aircraft. Making it safer, more reliable and of course a better plane for the pilot. The need for a modern glass cockpit was achieved with the installation of an Aspen Avionics Multi-Function Display (MFD) and a Primary-Function Display (PFD). Both were achieved with Aspen Pro Max 1000s.

Modern navigation functionality was achieved with the installation of Avidyne IFDs. An Avidyne IFD 550 and an Avidyne IFD 540 was installed providing the safety of redundant navigation systems and radios.

Finally, a new transponder with ADSB in and out was added providing for real time weather and traffic. This was done with the addition of an Avidyne Skytrax200 Dual Band ADS-B IN receiver coupled with an Avidyne AXP340 Panel mount Mode-S ADS-B Transponder.

The Aircraft

The Piaggio Royal Gull, also known as the Trecker Royal Gull, is a five (5) seat twin Lycoming powered amphibian. It is a 1954 model P136L1 and is the first Piaggio Aircraft certified in the United States. It cruises at 130 knots and has a range of 650 miles with reserves.

Project Photos

Piaggio Royal Gull
This is a view of the original starting point for the Gull project. Mostly orginal and/or older insltruments. With the exceptoin of a Garmin 430W on the lower center stack which was removed for this project.
Piaggio Royal Gull
A view of the new panel. Note the additions of the two Aspen Pro Max 1000 PFD and MFD. An avidyne IFD 550 and IFD 540 were added to the center stack and the elecrtronics International EMS's were installed in the upper panel. Note how much instrument clutter was reduced in the modernization upgrade.
Piaggio Royal Gull
Piaggio Gull on the water.
Piaggio Royal Gull
Piaggio Royal Gull in flight, fall colors.
Piaggio Royal Gull
Piaggio Royal Gull in flight showing the power of the twin pusher prop Lycoming engines.

Cessna 172 - Complete Panel Upgrade with Dynon Avionics

The Project:

The opportunity to completely change out an entire panel, at an affordable cost, has not been available for most certified aircraft until Dynon started moving into the certified market. As stated by Dynon: “For years, pilots of certified aircraft have been forced to choose between maintaining their dated, legacy instrumentation or upgrading their panel with expensive, piecemeal avionics upgrades.” This project took advantage of Dynon’s new “Well Equipped” system comprised of a Single 10” Display and Core System, plus Engine Monitoring, ADS-B In/Out, Transponder, COM Radio, IFR Connectivity, and autopilot. All in one integrated package, this makes the aircraft a perfect training aircraft and for the typical pilot, one of the most modern and safe systems available.

Dynon continues to increase the number of aircraft make and models on the STC with many 172’s currently on the list including models 172F thru S that include the autopilot. Of course, at the current time there are more makes and models on the list without autopilot as well. This is a unique opportunity for 172 owners, and we are quite pleased that the owner of this one was delighted with the result.

The Aircraft

The Cessna 172 Skyhawk is a four-seat, single-engine, high wing, fixed-wing aircraft made by the Cessna Aircraft Company. First flown in 1955, more 172s have been built than any other aircraft.The Skyhawk name was originally used for a trim package but was later applied to all standard-production 172 aircraft. Noted for its longevity and popularity, the Cessna 172 is the most successful aircraft in history. Cessna delivered the first production model in 1956, and as of 2015, the company and its partners had built more than 44,000 units. The aircraft remains in production today. It’s arguably the most widely used training aircraft in the industry.

Project Photos

The original panel before start of the project.
The original panel before start of the project.
Old instruments out, prepping for the new panel installation.
Old instruments out, prepping for the new panel installation.
New Panel installation in progress.
New Panel installation in progress.
Completed new panel ready to fly.
Completed new panel ready to fly.
Our hard working team on the job.
Our hard working team on the job.

Piper Aerostar 702P

The Project:

This aircraft had outdated flight instruments, many of which were original. The goal of the project was to integrate modern avionics into this unique and historic aircraft. Making it safer, more reliable, and of course a better plane for the pilot. The need for a modern glass cockpit was achieved with the installation of an Aspen Avionics Multi-Function Display (MFD) and a Primary-Function Display (PFD) both on the pilot’s side. In addition, the owner wanted the safety benefit of having an additional Aspen PFD on the copilot’s side of the cockpit. All were achieved with Aspen Pro Max 1000s.

Modern navigational functionality was achieved with the installation of Avidyne IFDs. An Avidyne IFD 550 and an Avidyne IFD 440 was installed providing the safety of redundant navigation systems and radios.

Finally, a new transponder with ADSB in and out was added providing for real time weather and traffic. This was done with the addition of an Avidyne Skytrax200 Dual Band ADS-B IN receiver coupled with an Avidyne AXP340 Panel mount Mode-S ADS-B Transponder.

The Aircraft

The Aerostar is the product of famed aircraft designer Ted Smith, the Model 600 emerged in 1968, with normally aspirated Lycoming IO-540 engines and a takeoff weight of 5500 poundsthe Model 600 emerged in 1968, with normally aspirated Lycoming IO-540 engines and a takeoff weight of 5500 pounds. A year later, the 601 appeared, with a pair of Rajay turbochargers and manually controlled, electrically actuated wastegates on each engine.The A models had Lycomings with heavier crankcases and crankshafts and engine TBO was boosted from 1400 hours to 2000 for the 600A and 1800 hours for the 601A. The first pressurized Aerostar, the 601P, appeared in 1974, good for an 11,000-foot cabin all the way to 25,000 feet. The tenth 601P emerged with a longer wing (stretched from 34.2 to 36.7 feet) and higher max takeoff weight, 6000 pounds. These changes were incorporated in the unpressurized turbo model in 1977.

Project Photos

Aerostar in hangar ready for Avionics upgrade - a beautiful bird.
The start of the Avionics upgrade in the AeroStar 702P. A complete and total panel upgrade.
The start of the Avionics upgrade in the AeroStar 702P. A complete and total panel upgrade.
A side view of the new panel on the 702P.
A side view of the new panel on the 702P.
A view of the new panel in flight.
A view of the new panel in flight.

Piper Aerostar 602P

The Project:

This aircraft had outdated flight instruments, many of which were original. The goal of the project was to integrate modern avionics into this unique and historic aircraft. Making it safer, more reliable, and of course a better plane for the pilot. The need for a modern glass cockpit was achieved with the installation of an Aspen Avionics Multi-Function Display (MFD) and a Primary-Function Display (PFD) both on the pilot’s side. In addition, the owner wanted the safety benefit of having an additional Aspen PFD on the copilot’s side of the cockpit. All were achieved with Aspen Pro Max 1000s.

Modern navigational functionality was achieved with the installation of Avidyne IFDs. An Avidyne IFD 550 and an Avidyne IFD 440 was installed providing the safety of redundant navigation systems and radios.

Finally, a new transponder with ADSB in and out was added providing for real time weather and traffic. This was done with the addition of an Avidyne Skytrax200 Dual Band ADS-B IN receiver coupled with an Avidyne AXP340 Panel mount Mode-S ADS-B Transponder.

The Aircraft

The Aerostar is the product of famed aircraft designer Ted Smith, the Model 600 emerged in 1968, with normally aspirated Lycoming IO-540 engines and a takeoff weight of 5500 poundsthe Model 600 emerged in 1968, with normally aspirated Lycoming IO-540 engines and a takeoff weight of 5500 pounds. A year later, the 601 appeared, with a pair of Rajay turbochargers and manually controlled, electrically actuated wastegates on each engine.The A models had Lycomings with heavier crankcases and crankshafts and engine TBO was boosted from 1400 hours to 2000 for the 600A and 1800 hours for the 601A. The first pressurized Aerostar, the 601P, appeared in 1974, good for an 11,000-foot cabin all the way to 25,000 feet. The tenth 601P emerged with a longer wing (stretched from 34.2 to 36.7 feet) and higher max takeoff weight, 6000 pounds. These changes were incorporated in the unpressurized turbo model in 1977.

Project Photos

Aerostar 602 Avioncs upgrade underway.
Aerostar 602 Avioncs upgrade underway.
The start of AeroStar 602 panel upgrade. In this aircraft its the center stack and pilot's side getting the upgrades.
The start of AeroStar 602 panel upgrade. In this aircraft its the center stack and pilot's side getting the upgrades.
Avionics upgrade work underway in the AeroStar 602.
Avionics upgrade work underway in the AeroStar 602.
Lots of hard but fun work in the luggage compartment of this 602.
Lots of hard but fun work in the luggage compartment of this 602.
New pilots side panel with a single Aspen Pro Max 1000 plus Garmin G5.
New pilots side panel with a single Aspen Pro Max 1000 plus Garmin G5.

Perceptive Avionics

Located in Western Wisconsin (KRNH), our team has over 50 years experience in aviation. We’re dedicated to making sure pilots like you have the latest tech at your fingertips.

Services

Panel Assessments & Recommendations
New Avionics Installations
System Training & Support
Pitot Static & Transponder Services
Avionics Products Support
Authorized Dealer

Contact Us

Perceptive Avionics
625 West Hangar Road
Hangar 16-1
New Richmond, WI 54017

(715) 338-4080
info@perceptiveavionics.com